Walk Day 02 – Pendeen to Lelant

Day 2 – April 5 Pendeen to Lelant
 Weather: Wind, Rain then Sun  B&B: Cornerways GH (Penzance £30)
 Departed: 09:45 Arrived: 17:00  Walked: 5h 52m Rested: 1 hr 26m
 Distance Today: 16.8 mi / 27.04 km  Total Distance: 26.77 mi / 43.08 km
 % Complete: ~ 2.43%  Pint of the Day: St. Austell’s Tribute Ale
 GPS Track for: Day 2

The bus dropped me at the same spot I was picked up yesterday afternoon and I headed along a quiet B-road for about a mile and half until I reached the tiny farming hamlet of Morvah. A short distance away I was able to connect up with the SWCP and headed in the direction of Zennor.

It was extremely windy and it remained so all day. The rain held off for about an hour but when it hit the skies really opened up. The combination of extreme wind and rain made the coastal path a bit tricky. There were several areas where cows had turned the path into a quagmire and I spent a long time picking a path through mud and brush. The first two hours were a real slog and I was seriously considering looking for an inland route when the skies lightened and the rain stopped. The second half of the walk into Zennor was much better underfoot and I rolled up to the Tinner’s Arms just after 1pm.

The Tinner’s Arms is well-known pub in these parts and it was absolutely stuffed this Easter Monday. I bought myself half a pint and found a bench outside where I chatted with another walker who had just completed the same route as me (in fact we passed one another all morning). She stopped for a rest about half an hour before Zennor and asked if I could let her friend Claire know she would be there shortly. Claire was quite surprised to receive a South West Coast Pathagram.

I spent a handful of days in St. Ives in 1996 and had already walked the path from St. Ives to Zennor. I had already decided to walk inland to St. Ives this time around. The inland route cut across farmers fields and the footpath was in excellent shape, with one notable exception. At one point I found myself in the middle of the muddiest field I have ever encountered in Britain. Usually you can pick a route around the edge of the field using the fence and some strategically placed stones but I soon found myself stranded in the middle of this mud and manure morass. I tried for about 10 minutes to find a better route but the chances of me falling face or ass first in the mud were increasing so I chose the shortest path and a few thoughtful explicatives and went for it. I ended up with very muddy shoes but it could have been a lot worse.

Not long after I found myself in busy St. Ives and walked down to the waterfront. Although St. Ives was my original destination I always had it in the back of my mind that I would try for Lelant a few miles further along. The weather was good and tomorrow’s forecast is bleak so I’d rather get these miles under my belt now.

I followed the cliff path around through Carbis Bay and then took a shortcut down to the beach where I walked the last mile or so into Lelant. I had 30 minutes before my bus back to Penzance so I cooled my heels in the Badger Inn.

I forgot to mention in yesterday’s post that I saw my first fox. I think that was the first time I’d ever seen a fox while walking in Britain. It spotted me too so it soon bounded off across the field and into a hedge. No foxes today, just lots of cows and rabbits … and a badger that serves pints.

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2 thoughts on “Walk Day 02 – Pendeen to Lelant

  1. Hi Steve, just got back from my holiday and caught up on latest LeJog Steve’s blog news. Sounds like you are really enjoying the experience, keep at it and I look forward to reading more (I’ll read it on company time -Oops just kidding Randy).
    Keep slogging and blogging!

    • Thanks Brent … I hope you had a great time in Mexico. I like “slogging and blogging”. Maybe I should change the blog name to “LESLOG”? Own time, company time, who’s counting?! Cheers, Steve.

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